8 Benefits of Watching Good Movies

You can enjoy a lot of benefits if you watch movies. After all, there is a reason why the entertainment industry is earning billions of dollars of revenue each year. All this is because of the benefits offered by movies. In this article, we are going to take a closer look at some of the most prominent benefits of watching movies. Read on to know more.

Awareness

Awareness is the number one reasons people watch movies. Most of the movies revolve around science fiction, social issues, and history. Therefore, many films have been made that spread awareness about a specific social issue.

The Experience

Many films and TV shows give you a great experience in the form of suspense. For instance, Game of Thrones created a lot of buzz in the industry. And this was epic. Therefore, having a great experience is one of the most amazing benefits of watching movies.

Fun

If you don’t have fun, you may lose your energy over time. Fun is what recharges your batteries. You can have fun in many ways and watching movies is one of them. As a matter of fact, there is nothing like enjoying your favorite title with your friends or family.

Pass Time

If have nothing to do on a hot summer day, you can go ahead and spend your spare time watching your favorite titles. As a matter of fact, you can spend all day sitting in front of your computer screen or TV watching movies that you find interesting.

Inspiration

Great films are quite inspirational. In fact, they can help people get better. Although most of the best-selling titles are based on action and sci-fi genre, you can find many titles that can help resolve social issues as well. Many movies are a source of inspiration for millions of people.

Stress Buster

As far as stress reduction is concerned, many people go for alcohol. However, there is a better alternative as well. If you watch a good movie with your friends, you can reduce your stress significantly. So, this is another great advantage that can improve your mental health and make you more productive.

Get Over a Breakup

If you have had a breakup recently, you can get over it by watching a good movie. Due to your breakup, you may be sad and heart-broken. Therefore, you can help yourself move on by spending a few hours watching a good show, which is another great benefit.

Entertainment

We all need entertainment. This is what movies offer in the here and now. Without entertainment, we feel boredom and can’t focus on our routine tasks. Entertainment is the need of everyone regardless of age, religion, cast or social status.

The Takeaway

In short, movies offer tons of great benefits for us all. Therefore, actors receive a lot of love and respect from across the globe. So, by spending a few bucks, you can watch your desired movies both online or in theaters. Hopefully, you will find this article informative.

Peekvid TV Shows Dexter a Good Time Party

Are you a fan of the new hit Showtime series, “Dexter?” I sure am and if you missed the

13th episode, don’t worry, Peekvid TV has got you covered in blood. If you like a good

mystery and a great guy who plays a serial killer, then you will be drawn into the dark

world of Dexter. He is a serial killer with more twists and turns then trying to find what

your looking for in Google.

Please keep in mind that Peekvid is not the only free movie watching site on the internet.

I reveal my “secret” list of free movie sites at MovieDownloadMatrix.com. If you can

put up with all the pop-ups on Peekvid, you will enjoy the easy navigation and simplicity.

I reveal two free movie sites that do not have the annoying pop-ups! Pop-ups are like

a cheese grater on my last nerve. Ouch! That hurt like Tabasco sauce on a paper cut!

Dexter uses whatever means necessary to kill off the psychos, who slip through the

cracks of the law system. Fortunately, Dexter has the dream job of being a blood

spatter forensic expert. He uses his dark cutting edge skill to catch and, with his

serial killer instincts, kill the monsters of society. Just the kind of guy you want

living on the block in New York City for a good time party.

Unlike all the other shows on TV, that focus on catching serials killers(CSI/Criminal Minds),

you get a chance to look at the world as Dexter sees it. You get a chance to take revenge

on the serial killers, through the dark eyes of Dexter. The filming of the show is well-done

like a steak at the Outback. I sincerely believe that Dexter will keep Showtime looking

bloody good and it is about time.

If you want a show where you say, “Wow! I should have thought of that!”, then Dexter is a

real artistic piece of work, who pulls at your heart strings. One scene shows Dexter

like he is at a good time party! He is dreaming about all the people cheering him on for killing

all the low lifes of society. As he is walking through the crowd, there is confetti flying

everywhere, now that is what I call a good time party!

FACT: Confetti really does enhance the gaiety of a festive event or parade.

Peekvid TV has the Dexter episode where he finds out his brother is also a serial killer.

There is only one problem for dear old Dexter, his brother is a serial killer, who wants

Dexter to kill for the joy of the kill. He does not follow the same code of killing that

Dexter does. He tries to bring Dexter over to his world and he lovingly says, “you will

be free Dexter.” While he is teaching Dexter to be free, Dexter’s sister is tied down in

saran wrap on a cold steel table. Will this loving family work out their deep-seated

issues? Will Hillary Clinton be the next President of the United States? If you have

some time to “kill”, then run on over to Dexter’s place and bring some hot sauce!

Early Learning – Can Movies and TV Ever Be Good For Babies and Small Children?

What an important question! As a parent of a baby or toddler, you want to help your little one reach his or her potential. We know that language and social skills are very important for success in school and in life. And what better time to start than when your child is young?

First, the bad news–the really bad news. “Excessive viewing before age three has been shown to be associated with problems of attention control, aggressive behavior and poor cognitive development. Early television viewing has exploded in recent years, and is one of the major public health issues facing American children,” according to University of Washington researcher Frederick Zimmerman.

In this article, we’ll look at the suggested links between screen time and lower vocabulary, ADHD, autism, and violent behaviour. Then we’ll look at how you might possibly use baby TV and movies to help your child learn.

LOWER LANGUAGE SKILLS A University of Washington study shows that 40% of three-month-old babies and 90% of two-year-olds “watch” TV or movies regularly. Researchers found that parents allowed their babies and toddlers to watch educational TV, baby videos/DVDs, other children’s programs and adult programs.

What can we learn from this study?

* “Most parents seek what’s best for their child, and we discovered that many parents believe that they are providing educational and brain development opportunities by exposing their babies to 10 to 20 hours of viewing per week,” says researcher Andrew Meltzoff, a developmental psychologist.

* According to Frederick Zimmerman, lead author of the study, that’s a bad thing. “Exposure to TV takes time away from more developmentally appropriate activities such as a parent or adult caregiver and an infant engaging in free play with dolls, blocks or cars… ” he says.

* Infants age 8 to 16 months who viewed baby programs knew fewer words than those who did not view them.

“The more videos they watched, the fewer words they knew,” says Dr. Dimitri Christakis. “These babies scored about 10% lower on language skills than infants who had not watched these videos.”

* Meltzoff says that parents “instinctively adjust their speech, eye gaze and social signals to support language acquisition”–obviously something no machine can do!

* Surprisingly, it didn’t make any difference whether the parent watched with the infant or not!

Why did these babies learn more slowly? Dr. Vic Strasburger, pediatrics professor at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, says “Babies require face-to-face interaction to learn. They don’t get that interaction from watching TV or videos. In fact, the watching probably interferes with the crucial wiring being laid down in their brains during early development.”

ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is characterized by problems with attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. A link between ADHD and early TV viewing has been noted by Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH et al.

“In contrast to the pace with which real life unfolds and is experienced by young children, television can portray rapidly changing images, scenery, and events. It can be overstimulating yet extremely interesting, ” say the researchers. “We found that early exposure to television was associated with subsequent attentional problems.”

The researchers examined data for 1278 children at the age of one year and 1345 children at age three. They found that an extra hour of daily television watching at these ages translated into a ten percent higher probability that the child would exhibit ADHD behaviours by the age of seven.

AUTISM Autism is characterized by poor or no language skills, poor social skills, unusual repetitive behaviours and obsessive interests. A University of Cornell study found that higher rates of autism appeared to be linked to higher rates of screen time.

The researchers hypothesize that “a small segment of the population is vulnerable to developing autism because of their underlying biology and that either too much or certain types of early childhood television watching serves as a trigger for the condition.”

In his commentary on this study in Slate magazine, Gregg Easterbrook notes that autistic children have abnormal activity in the visual-processing areas of their brains. As these areas are developing rapidly during the first three years of a child’s life, he wonders whether “excessive viewing of brightly colored two-dimensional screen images” can cause problems. I find this comment highly interesting, as it would apply to the full spectrum from “quality children’s programming” to adult material.

VIOLENT BEHAVIOUR The National Association for the Education of Young Children identified the following areas of concern about children watching violence on TV: * Children may become less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others. * They may be more likely to behave in aggressive or harmful ways toward others. * They may become more fearful of the world around them.

The American Psychological Association reports on several studies in which some children watched a violent program and others watched a nonviolent one. Those in the first group were slower to intervene, either directly or by calling for help, when they saw younger children fighting or breaking toys after the program.

Now that we know the bad news…

Is it possible to use movies at all? I think it is. I believe the key is to USE the program, not just WATCH it. Most people know that it’s very good to read to babies, but no one would set a book before a baby and walk away, thinking it will do her any good at all!

Rock your baby or tap the rhythm to classical music or children’s songs.

Be very, very choosy about what your young child watches–and watch with him. Does the program show kindness, helpfulness, generosity… whatever values you wish your little one to learn?

When she is old enough to relate to the images of people, animals and toys, talk to her about what she’s seeing. “Look at the puppy. He’s playing with the kitten. They’re friends. Mommy is your friend.” “The baby birds are hungry. They’re calling for their mommy. She’s going to come back with some food.” “Oh no! The baby lamb is lost. I wonder if the shepherd will find him.”

Make screen time a special–and highly limited–time that the two of you share. Treat a baby or young children’s movie the way you treat a book–as another tool to give you topics for interaction with your little one.